|| NOTICE BOARD ||

* * * THIS BLOG CAN BE BEST VIEWED ON GOOGLE CHROME * * * Quitters never win Winners never quit * * *

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Unit 7 Transport Layer Protocol

UDP

The User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core members of the Internet Protocol Suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without requiring prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. UDP is sometimes called the Universal Datagram Protocol. The protocol was designed by David P. Reed in 1980 and formally defined in RFC 768 .

UDP uses a simple transmission model without implicit hand-shaking dialogues for guaranteeing reliability, ordering, or data integrity. Thus, UDP provides an unreliable service and datagrams may arrive out of order, appear duplicated, or go missing without notice. UDP assumes that error checking and correction is either not necessary or performed in the application, avoiding the overhead of such processing at the network interface level. Time-sensitive applications often use UDP because dropping packets is preferable to using delayed packets. If error correction facilities are needed at the network interface level, an application may use the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) which are designed for this purpose.

UDP's stateless nature is also useful for servers that answer small queries from huge numbers of clients. Unlike TCP , UDP is compatible with packet broadcast (sending to all on local network) and multicasting (send to all subscribers).

Common network applications that use UDP include: the Domain Name System (DNS), streaming media applications such as IPTV , Voice over IP (VoIP), Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) and many online games.

TCP

The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol Suit. TCP was one of the two original components, with Internet Protocol (IP), of the suite, so that the entire suite is commonly referred to as TCP/IP. Whereas IP handles lower-level transmissions from computer to computer as a message makes its way across the Internet, TCP operates at a higher level, concerned only with the two end systems, for example, a Web browser and a Web server. In particular, TCP provides reliable, ordered delivery of a stream of bytes from a program on one computer to another program on another computer. Besides the Web, other common applications of TCP include e-mail and file transfer. Among its other management tasks, TCP controls message size, the rate at which messages are exchanged, and network traffic congestion.

SCTP

In computer networking, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is a Transport Layer Protocol, serving in a similar role as the popular protocols Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP). Indeed, it provides some of the same service features of both, ensuring reliable, in-sequence transport of messages with congestion control.

The protocol was defined by the IETF Signaling Transport (SIGTRAN) working group in 2000, and is maintained by the IETF Transport Area (TSVWG) working group.RFC 4960 defines the protocol RFC 3286. provides an introduction.

In the absence of native SCTP support in operating systems it is possible to tunnel SCTP over UDP, as well as mapping TCP API calls to SCTP ones.

0 Comments:

इस ब्लाग की सामग्री को यथाशुद्ध प्रस्तुत करने का प्रयास किया गया है फिर भी किसी भी त्रुटि के लिए प्रकाशक जिम्मेदार नहीं होगा